Meet the LOC – Ulrike Zartler

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

ZartlerWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?

My main fields of interest are family sociology and childhood sociology. Over the past years, I have been particularly engaged in research on post-divorce families and have asked why the nuclear family still serves as an ideological code. These research interests go along with a strong focus on the sociological analysis of legal frameworks that shape families’ and children’s lives.

What characterizes your scientific work?

In my research, I adopt a concept of families as broadly defined varieties of being related. In my empirical research, I try to capture as many perspectives as possible and to include different family members. This usually gives tremendously divergent pictures about the – apparently – same family. I especially like to conduct studies with children, because they are so unpredictable and demand a particular openness and flexibility.

What is the main professional activity you are engaged in?

Doing research, writing papers, teaching and supervising are the everyday basic features. Furthermore, I am Deputy Head of the Department of Sociology, a Board member of the ESA RN 13 (Sociology of Families and Intimate Lives) and of the Austrian Society on Interdisciplinary Family Research (ÖGIF).

What are your next projects or publications?

I am currently preparing journal manuscripts on the following issues: Children’s networks in post-divorce dual residence arrangements; Intergenerational relationships at the transition to parenthood; Multiple perspectives in qualitative longitudinal family research.


Ulrike Zartler is an assistant professor of family sociology at the University of Vienna, Department of Sociology. Her research interests cover family sociology, childhood sociology, divorce and post-divorce families, legal aspects of family and childhood, and qualitative research methods.

Meet the LOC – Roland Verwiebe

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

VerwiebeWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?

All issues related to social stratification and social inequality. Research on migration and the labor market using quantitative as well as qualitative research methods has been my major focus during the last 10-15 years. I was living in Berlin when I started to work in this field. In the mid-1990’s the city changed dramatically. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, one driving force was a newly emerging migration to Berlin, mainly from European countries (e.g. UK, France, Sweden, Poland) and the US. Continue reading

Meet the LOC – Frank Welz

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

frank_welzWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?

My main field has been interest-driven, historically-anchored theory. For C.W. Mills individual lives reflect societal transformation. For studying, for instance, the impact of the Great Recession on the lives of individuals, it can’t work without theory. Theory raises the big questions, such as the transformation of sovereignty in the current global era. It provides guidance in the face of sociology’s internal fragmentation and it pervades the discipline by providing conceptual tools for sociological research. We all draw on theory for building our arguments — but we hardly have time to reflect on it. If sociology should have an impact on society, the eye of the needle is the theory of society. Continue reading

Meet the LOC – Martin Weichbold

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

WeichboldWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?
I am mostly interested in methods and methodology; empirical data are the basis for all sociological analyses and a poor quality of data affects all findings. It’s astonishing to see that some researchers put a lot of effort and know-how into statistics and use very sophisticated data analysis methods, but don’t wonder about the origin of the data they use and how they were constructed.
Continue reading

Meet the LOC – Beate Littig

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.  

Beate LittigWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it? 
I am especially interested in the relationships between nature and society(ies) and the non-sustainability of these. Climate Change, peak oil, the loss of bio-diversity are some of the relevant key words here. The depletion of natural resources and the ongoing  damages of ecological systems have manifold social impacts, which are closely related to social inequality on the national and global scale. Thus environmental justice, post-growth societies, a good life for all, or more general, socio-ecological transformation towards sustainable development are to me the most important  challenges of our time.

What characterizes your scientific work?

Continue reading

Meet the LOC – Max Haller

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

HallerWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?

My main fields in sociology are social inequality, ethnic and national identity, sociology of science, sociological theory, and international comparative research. This comes partly from my background: I was born in 1947 in South Tyrol (a north Italian province with a German-speaking minority) as the son of a mountain farmer. In my sociological work, I try always to establish a close connection between theoretical concepts and hypotheses and empirical research.

What characterizes your scientific work?

Most of my work was based on empirical research; from larger projects, several monographs resulted (on National Identity, European Elites, Income Inequality worldwide). I try to combine in all that work theoretical considerations and develop concrete and testable hypotheses. Most of the work used quantitative methods, using standardized surveys and statistical data. But I appreciate also qualitative work and used such methods, for instance, in a study on Nobel Prize winners. Both quantitative methods and research as well as qualitative research can remain very narrow-minded and scientifically boring, if they focus only on the data, by analyzing statistically or by describing some social reality without a clear theoretical focus. Continue reading

Meet the LOC – Jörg Flecker

In our series “Meet the LOC” we would like to introduce you to the members of our Local Organizing Committee. The previous entries in this series can be found here.

Picture of Jörg FleckerWhat is your main sociological field of study and what sparked your interest in it?
My main field of research is sociology of work and employment. The research area attracted my interest in the 1980s because of the rapid technological change and the implementation of ICTs. This raised a number of questions from skills and management control to job security and the gender division of labor.

What characterizes your scientific work?
My focus is on theory-driven empirical work trying to promote the understanding of current social dynamics. This often also includes developing a critical perspective on social phenomena and giving those people a voice who are usually not present in the media or in politics.

What is the main professional activity you are engaged in?
The usual mixture, I suppose: Teaching, supervising theses, supervising research grant applications, directing and participating in research projects, writing papers, giving public lectures, talking to the media.

What are your next projects or publications?
I am currently finalizing an edited volume on ‘Space, Place and Global Digital Work’ that will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. This has been a publication project within the framework of the European COST Action IS 1202 ‘Dynamics of Virtual Work’. The next publication project is a German-language textbook on work and employment.


Jörg Flecker is a professor of sociology at the Department of Sociology at the University of Vienna. His research is mainly focused on critical labor studies, industrial relations, public service transformation and transnationalisation. He is currently a member of the management of the European COST Action Dynamics of Virtual Work.